Heim

Diskussion:Japanische Amerikaner

@Asthma: Die besten Quellen zu dieser Thematik können ja wohl nur amerikanische sein. Und wahllos sind sie schon garnicht, wobei ich leider davon ausgehen muss, dass du sie weder gelesen noch verstanden hast. Du hast offensichtlich null Ahnung. ARMUTSZEUGNIS!--74.53.36.172 20:33, 11. Jul. 2007 (CEST)

Inwiefern ist denn eine Übersetzung VANDALISMUS? siehe: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_Americans; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_American_Redress_%26_Court_Cases; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_American_internment: References and notes ... ^ a b c Various primary and secondary sources list counts between 110,000 and 120,000 persons. ^ Semiannual Report of the War Relocation Authority, for the period January 1 to June 30, 1946, not dated. Papers of Dillon S. Myer. Scanned image at trumanlibrary.org. Accessed 18 Sept. 2006. ^ a b "The War Relocation Authority and The Incarceration of Japanese Americans During World War II: 1948 Chronology," Web page at www.trumanlibrary.org, accessed 11 Sep 2006 ^ a b c d e Korematsu v. United States dissent by Justice Owen Josephus Roberts, reproduced at findlaw.com, accessed 12 Sept. 2006 ^ a b Korematsu v. United States majority opinion by Justice Hugo Black, reproduced at findlaw.com, accessed 11 Sept. 2006 ^ 100th Congress, S. 1009, reproduced at internmentarchives.com; accessed 19 Sept. 2006. ^ http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=intern ^ "Department of Justice and U.S. Army Facilities," web page from U.S. National Park Service, accessed 31 Aug 2006 ^ Confinement and Ethnicity: An Overview of World War II Japanese American Relocation Sites, by Jeffery F. Burton, Mary M. Farrell, Florence B. Lord, and Richard W. Lord, reproduced as an online document (Chapter 16) at www.nps.gov, accessed 31 Aug 2006 ^ Confinement and Ethnicity: An Overview of World War II Japanese American Relocation Sites, by Jeffery F. Burton, Mary M. Farrell, Florence B. Lord, and Richard W. Lord, reproduced as an online document (Chapter 3) at www.nps.gov, accessed 31 Aug 2006 ^ Fred Mullen, "DeWitt Attitude on Japs Upsets Plans," Watsonville Register-Pajaronian, April 16, 1943. p.1, reproduced by Santa Cruz Public Library, accessed 11 Sept. 2006 ^ Testimony of John L. DeWitt, 13 April 1943, House Naval Affairs Subcommittee to Investigate Congested Areas, Part 3, pp. 739-40 (78th Cong ., 1st Sess.), cited in Korematsu v. United States, footnote 2, reproduced at findlaw.com, accessed 11 Sept. 2006 ^ WWII Enemy Alien Control Overview from archives.gov, accessed 8 Jan. 2007 ^ a b c d Hirabayashi v. United States, reproduced at findlaw.com; accessed 15 Sept. 2006 ^ Korematsu v. United States dissent by Justice Frank Murphy, footnote 12, reproduced at findlaw.com, accessed 11 Sept. 2006 ^ U.S. National Archives, results detail.jsp?&pg=9&si=0&nh=26&st=b ARC ID 537854, retrieved 9 Aug 2006 ^ U.S. Library of Congress gallery photo, Call number LC-USF33- 013285-M1, digital ID fsa 8a31149 ^ http://www.internmentarchives.com/showdoc.php?docid=00315&search_id=15330&pagenum=1 ^ http://www4.army.mil/ocpa/read.php?story_id_key=1813 ^ "Japanese-Americans Internment Camps During World War II," web page at Utah.edu. Accessed 01 Oct 2006. ^ http://www.the-catbird-seat.net/PearlHarbor.htm ^ Attributed to a letter from John J. McCloy to Jane B. Kaihatsu, April 12, 1984. This reference should be upgraded.


Main article: Japanese American internment


One of the darkest parts of American history were the Japanese American internment camps; an estimated 120,000 Japanese were sent to eleven different camps across the US, mostly in the west. During World War II, Japanese Americans were interned in special camps. Americans of Japanese ancestry living in the western United States, including the Nisei, were forcibly interned with their parents and children (the Sansei Japanese Americans) during World War II.

Despite this abusive treatment, many Japanese Americans served with great distinction during World War II in the American forces. The 442nd Regimental Combat Team/100th Infantry Battalion is the most highly decorated unit in U.S. military history. Composed of Japanese Americans, the 442nd/100th fought valiantly in the European Theater even as many of their families remained in the detention camps stateside. The 100th was one of the first units to liberate the prisoners of the Nazi concentration camp at Dachau. Hawaiʻi Senator Daniel K. Inouye is a veteran of the 442nd. Additionally the Military Intelligence Service consisted of Japanese Americans who served in the Pacific Front.

For the most part, the internees remained in the camps until the end of the war, when they left the camps to rebuild their lives in the West Coast. Several Japanese Americans have started cases against the U.S. government regarding their wrongful internment, which dragged on for decades.

Notes and references ^ US Census Bureau, Japanese alone or in combination in 2005. Retrieved on 2006-12-16. ^ Norman Mineta, The Japanese Americans: The War at Home. Retrieved on 2007-05-01. Lai, Eric, and Dennis Arguelles, eds. "The New Face of Asian Pacific America: Numbers, Diversity, and Change in the 21st Century." San Francisco, CA: Asian Week, 2003. Kikumura-Yano, Akemi, ed. "Encyclopedia of Japanese Descendants in the Americas." Walnut Creek, CA: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2002. frdl gruß References and notes ^ a b c Various primary and secondary sources list counts between 110,000 and 120,000 persons. ^ Semiannual Report of the War Relocation Authority, for the period January 1 to June 30, 1946, not dated. Papers of Dillon S. Myer. Scanned image at trumanlibrary.org. Accessed 18 Sept. 2006. ^ a b "The War Relocation Authority and The Incarceration of Japanese Americans During World War II: 1948 Chronology," Web page at www.trumanlibrary.org, accessed 11 Sep 2006 ^ a b c d e Korematsu v. United States dissent by Justice Owen Josephus Roberts, reproduced at findlaw.com, accessed 12 Sept. 2006 ^ a b Korematsu v. United States majority opinion by Justice Hugo Black, reproduced at findlaw.com, accessed 11 Sept. 2006 ^ 100th Congress, S. 1009, reproduced at internmentarchives.com; accessed 19 Sept. 2006.--74.53.36.172 10:25, 12. Jul. 2007 (CEST)